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Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”
instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”

instagram:

Moments from Ghana and Beyond with @africashowboy

To see more of Africa through Nana’s lens, follow @africashowboy on Instagram.

Africa’s relationship with photography is complicated, explains Nana Kofi Acquah (@africashowboy), a journalist and creative director-turned-photographer from Accra, Ghana. “Even though it is undeniable that African photographers saw the opportunity to fight stereotypes with their pictures, the truth was that cameras and film were extremely expensive and therefore not something to be wasted on unimportant casual moments. Today, how Ghanaians interact with photographs has changed rapidly.”

Nana’s work for businesses and non-profits takes him across Africa, and his Instagram photos reflects moments both profound and banal. “I don’t believe a photograph always needs to be dramatic, ecstatic, or tragic to pique people’s interest,” he says. “I am not afraid to photograph the mundane because I know posterity might appreciate it—and in that sense, I think like a historian. My audience is anybody who is interested to know more about Africa.”

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